Shrubs and evergreens in high demand six months after Superstorm Sandy slammed northeast Ohio

WESTLAKE, Ohio - On Oct. 29, Hurricane Sandy turned into Superstorm Sandy and unleashed its fury on northeast Ohio.

High winds and huge Lake Erie waves damaged docks and sank dozens of boats at Cleveland's Edgewater Marina, which is closed for the season for repairs and won't open again until next year.

But six months later, Sandy's impact is still being felt on land.

Cahoon Nursery on Detroit Road in Westlake has never been this busy.

The superstorm left many communities in the area reeling, just as winter was closing in leaving little or no time to clear trees, grind stumps and re-plant.

But now that it's late April, homeowners and landscapers are re-planting and evergreens, like arborvitaes, are in high demand.

Cahoon Nursery co-owner Brian Corrigan doubled tree and shrub orders this spring, but it's still not enough to keep up with demand.

Many people want to replace what Mother Nature ripped away.

Corrigan said the most common mistake is people planting trees and shrubs too deep in northern Ohio's clay soil.

Corrigan said it's best to leave a quarter of the tree above ground, and to make sure the previous stump and all the mulch has been completely removed before re-planting.

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