Report: Terrelle Pryor's mom denies wrongdoing, says she can afford son's car payment

COLUMBUS - The mother of Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor is defending her son in the wake of an NCAA investigation into his use of several deal-owned cars, according to Columbus TV station WBNS.

Pryor has been tied to eight different cars during his three years at Ohio State, and he was most recently seen driving a 2007 Nissan 350z with temporary tags at the team's meeting Monday night.

The car was purchased in his mother Thomasina's name, and she told WBNS that she can afford the car payments.

"I am not doing anything wrong," she told WBNS. "I mean, I have a job, I work all the time. My son's had a car since he was 18-year-old. What's the difference? Everybody has a car. It doesn't matter to me. My son is what matters to me. I wish everybody would understand that."

According to WBNS, the car payment is about $300 a month for the next four and a half years.

The car was allegedly purchased at Columbus used car dealership Auto Direct. The NCAA and Ohio State are investigating Pryor's relationship with the dealership because he has been seen driving "loaner" cars owned by the dealership.

WBNS has video of him driving a Dodge Challenger in March and April that was owned by Auto Direct.

Pryor is already suspended for the first five games of next season for selling team memorabilia in exchange for tattoos.

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