Obama and Bill Clinton to campaign together in three states, including Ohio

WASHINGTON - President Barack Obama and Bill Clinton will campaign together Monday, opening the final full week before Election Day with a three-state battleground blitz.

The joint rallies underscore Clinton's role as perhaps Obama's most important surrogate in the tightly contested White House race with Republican Mitt Romney. In campaign events, television advertisements and a well-regarded speech at the Democratic convention, the former president has been a chief defender of Obama's economic record, winning praise for sometimes explaining that record better than Obama himself.

The two will headline rallies Monday in Orlando, Fla., Youngstown, Ohio, and Prince William County, Va. It's the first time Obama and Clinton will campaign together during this election, though they have shared the stage at fundraisers and appeared together briefly at the party convention.

The three states are among the biggest electoral prizes up for grabs in the Nov. 6 election. Polls show Obama has an edge in Ohio, but Romney has whittled away the president's earlier leads in Florida and Virginia.

For Obama and Clinton, the rallies serve as another benchmark in a year that has solidified their transition from political rivals to allies.

Following his convention speech, Clinton has made a series of solo appearances on Obama's behalf. A high-profile event in Ohio last week also featured Bruce Springsteen.

Clinton has also appeared in campaign ads, including one out this week where the former president argues that Obama "got it right" with his economic agenda. And he's helped both Obama's campaign and the main super political action committee supporting him raise money.\

Obama advisers are banking that Clinton's presence on the campaign trail will shore up the Democratic base. And they hope undecided voters will draw a connection between Obama's policies and the ones Clinton pushed when he presided over a thriving economy.

Print this article Back to Top

Comments

Related Stories

President Barack Obama tells Pope Francis he is a President Barack Obama tells Pope Francis he is a 'great admirer'

President Barack Obama called himself a "great admirer" of Pope Francis as he sat down at the Vatican Thursday.

Putin defends Crimean vote, blasts West Putin defends Crimean vote, blasts West

President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday fiercely defended Russia's move to annex Crimea, saying the rights of ethnic Russians have been abused by the new Ukrainian government.

 

Republican deficit hawks pan President Obama Republican deficit hawks pan President Obama's $3.9T budget

Republicans are dismissing President Barack Obama's new $3.9 trillion budget.

Obama threatens Karzai with full U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan Obama threatens Karzai with full U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan

President Barack Obama is ordering the Pentagon to accelerate planning for a full U.S. troop withdrawal from Afghanistan.

Addressable TV lets advertisers pinpoint specific homes for commercials Addressable TV lets advertisers pinpoint specific homes for commercials

Addressable TV lets advertisers pinpoint specific homes for commercials.

Scholars: Eleanor Roosevelt was the best first lady; Michelle Obama ranks 5th Scholars: Eleanor Roosevelt was the best first lady; Michelle Obama ranks 5th

A survey of academics has found that Eleanor Roosevelt was the nation's best first lady. Michelle Obama ranks fifth.

As Obama backs wage hike, a look at state efforts As Obama backs wage hike, a look at state efforts

President Barack Obama said in his State of the Union address Tuesday that he will sign an executive order setting the minimum wage for workers covered by new federal contracts at $10.10 an hour, a big jump from the current federal minimum of $7.25. Obama hopes his order will spur Congress to increase the minimum wage for all employees.

Obama touts plans on contractor wages, retirement Obama touts plans on contractor wages, retirement

President Barack Obama is promoting his newly unveiled plans to boost wages for some workers and help Americans save for retirement -- no action from Congress necessary.

The new face of food stamps: working-age Americans The new face of food stamps: working-age Americans

In a first, working-age people now make up the majority in U.S. households that rely on food stamps -- a switch from a few years ago, when children and the elderly were the main recipients.

Five things to know about the State of the Union Five things to know about the State of the Union

State of the Union night is coming up. Time to set the record straight on a few things: Yup, Bill Clinton really was the most long-winded. Nope, it doesn't have to be a speech. And, in truth, this "annual" event doesn't happen every year.