Consumer concerns about what's in ground beef

You may want to check the ground beef in your refrigerator.

Seventy percent of the ground beef consumers buy at  the supermarket contains something called "pink slime."  That's according to Gerald Zirnstein, a former United States Department of Agriculture scientist turned whistleblower.

Pink slime is beef trimmings. Once only used in dog food and cooking oil, the trimmings are now sprayed with ammonia so they are safe to eat and added to most ground beef as cheaper filler. 

It was Zirnstein who, in an USDA memo, first coined the term "pink slime" and is now coming forward to say he won't buy it.

"It's economic fraud," Zirnstein told ABC News.  "It's not fresh ground beef, it's a cheap substitute being added in."

Zirnstein said he warned against using what the industry calls "lean finely textured beef," but his government bosses overruled them. He now grinds his own hamburger.

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