Wendy's says its ground beef is 'pink slime'-free

DUBLIN, Ohio - The Wendy's Co. ran full-page advertisements in eight major newspapers across the country Friday, reassuring customers that it has never used the beef filler known as "pink slime" and never will.

It is the latest company to publicly speak out against the filler, known in the industry as lean, finely textured beef, as public concern about it grows.

Wendy's ran ads in the New York Times, USA Today, Los Angeles Times and other publications, letting its customers know the company only uses 100 percent beef with no additives, fillers, preservatives or flavor boosters.

The low-cost filler is made from leftover bits of meat that are processed to remove most of the fat, treated with ammonia to kill bacteria and then mixed into fattier meats to produce overall leaner product.

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